Indiana volunteer honored for supporting disabled veterans

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RENO, Nev. – Angel “Louie” Pabey of Crown Point, Ind., a volunteer  who has donated thousands of hours of his time to help fellow veterans, has been selected by DAV (Disabled American Veterans) as the charity’s top volunteer. The 2018 George H. Seal Memorial Trophy will be presented by DAV National Commander Delphine Metcalf-Foster at the at the organization’s 97th National Convention July 14 in Reno, Nev.

The prestigious volunteer awards honor the best of thousands of remarkable men and women who serve in the Department of Veterans Affairs Voluntary Service program through DAV.

“Louie exemplifies what it means to keep the promise to the men and women who served our nation,” said Metcalf-Foster. “He goes above and beyond the call of duty by making himself available at all times to veterans in need. His selfless dedication is a true hallmark of the DAV mission.”

Pabey has volunteered through the Department of Veteran Affairs Voluntary Service program for the last eight years. During this time, he has donated more than 6,110 hours of his time as a driver for the DAV Volunteer Transportation Network and as the DAV hospital service coordinator for the Adam Benjamin Jr. VA Outpatient Clinic. Pabey is known to step up when additional help is needed, such as a volunteer calling in sick. When any unexpected situation arises impacting drivers, Pabey is there to transport patients to their appointments on time. If a main shuttle breaks down, Louie arrives on scene with other drivers and vans to transport veterans to their appointments in Chicago.

Pabey, an Army veteran who served during Vietnam, is a life member of DAV Chapter 17 in Crown Point.

“Louie steps up to the plate every hour of every day,” said Metcalf-Foster. “I’m proud of him and of all our volunteers who ensure veterans get the help they need.”

 

 About DAV:
DAV empowers veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. It is dedicated to a single purpose: fulfilling our promises to the men and women who served. DAV does this by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; fighting for the interests of America’s injured heroes on Capitol Hill; providing employment resources to veterans and their families and educating the public about the great sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning back to civilian life. DAV, a non-profit organization with more than 1 million members, was founded in 1920 and chartered by the U.S. Congress in 1932.